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Traditional Information Bulletin #19
Traditions-OK
Number 19 - April 2006

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Group Co-ordinator and Bulletin Editor:
Kenneth Ruddle, Asahigaoka-cho 7-22-511, Ashiya-shi, Hyogo-ken, Japan 659-0012.

Production:
Information Section, Marine Resources Division, SPC, B.P. D5, 98848 Noumea Cedex, New Caledonia. Fax: (687) 263818

Produced with financial assistance from Australia, France and New Zealand.


Note from the editor

To begin this issue we welcome a contribution from Sébastien Larrue, who in Giant clam fishing on the island of Tubuai, Austral Islands group: between local portrayals, economic necessity and ecological realities reviews conflicting perspectives on the introduction of a management system for giant clams (Tridacna maxima). Giant clams have become an important source of cash on this French Polynesian island, but exports to Tahiti threaten the sustainability of the fishery. The local situation is complex. On the one hand, the Tahiti Fisheries Department wants to monitor exports, while on the other, local island authorities debate a possible modernisation of the rahui, a traditional system of lagoon management. Many fishers do not support the claims of the scientific community, and in this they are widely supported by elders, whose views are in turn contested by certain ‘wise men’. It makes for an interesting read.

Anna Tiraa continues the theme of rahui in a modern context with her contribution, Ra’ui in the Cook Islands – today’s context in Rarotonga. She describes the efforts of a group of traditional leaders to reintroduce the ra’ui around the coast of Rarotonga. One leader noted “…there was resistance because the younger generation didn’t know what ra’ui meant. They didn’t realise that in those days the fish were bigger and they weren’t scarce”. Unfortunately, this is becoming a widespread lament, and one that will certainly have a serious impact on the content and transmission of local knowledge.

Based on their experience in establishing marine protection in the Western Solomon Islands, in the third article, Early effects of a community-based marine protected area on the food security of participating households, Pamela Weiant and Shankar Aswani seek to understand the contribution of some women’s fishing activities to meeting livelihood needs, differences in household responses to a CB-MPA, and the relationship between food security and reef health. Their contribution is particularly valuable because in other studies of CB-MPA these topics have remained relatively unexamined.

Finally, we introduce a new eBook publisher, the International Resources Management Institute based in Hong Kong, and announce its first publication.

Kenneth Ruddle


Contents

Giant clam fishing on the island of Tubuai, Austral Islands group: Between local portrayals, economic necessity and ecological realities
Larrue S. (pdf: 306 KB)
Ra'ui in the Cook Islands - Today's context in Rarotonga
Tiraa A. (pdf: 78 KB)
Early effects of a community-based marine protected area on the food security of participating households
Weiant P., Aswani S. (pdf: 813 KB)
 

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Traditional #19 (pdf: )



 

 
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