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Traditional Information Bulletin #17
Traditions-OK
Number 17 - December 2004

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Group Co-ordinator and Bulletin Editor:
Kenneth Ruddle, Asahigaoka-cho 7-22-511, Ashiya-shi, Hyogo-ken, Japan 659-0012.

Production:
Information Section, Marine Resources Division, SPC, B.P. D5, 98848 Noumea Cedex, New Caledonia. Fax: (687) 263818

Produced with financial assistance from Australia, France and New Zealand.


Note from the editor

Finally, I think we can celebrate, for this is the first issue of this particular Special Interest Group Bulletin that is based entirely on submitted manuscripts. Not only that, we overflowed, and have had to delay some articles until the next issue. But gentle reader, please don’t relax even a little, for this laudable trend will never continue without your constant efforts.

In the first article, A cultural consensus analysis of marine ecological knowledge in the Solomon Islands, Kevin L. Grant and Marc L. Miller examine the merits of “cultural consensus analysis” and apply it to a case study of the ecological knowledge of Solomon Islanders. The authors are particularly interested in any differences between officially protected and unprotected areas, based on the assertions that practical, behaviour-oriented, and observation-based, local marine environmental knowledge is relevant to fisheries management and that the success or failure of conservation efforts depends largely on the attitudes of communities.

In Tabus or not taboos?: How to use traditional environmental knowledge to support sustainable development of marine resources in Melanesia, Anne Caillaud et al. summarise the results of a workshop on Traditional Knowledge and Coastal Resource Conservation for Countries and States of the Melanesian Spearhead Group, held at the International Marine Project Activities Centre (IMPAC) in Townsville, Australia, during March–April 2004. The workshop sought underlying principles and themes to enhance the use and recognition of local or traditional knowledge and laws to improve biodiversity conservation and management of coastal resources. The case studies collated in this article examine linkages between customary laws, especially fisheries management, and existing government regulations, the objective being to ensure that those regulations fully embrace customary practices. The studies demonstrate where local or traditional and customary management practices have been recognised within national laws, and suggest how appropriate local or traditional aspects can be drafted into policy and law within the different levels of government (local, provincial or state, national or federal; and international within multilateral environment agreements). The studies could be used to establish better cooperation between traditional and “modern” knowledge and ensure optimal use of national marine resources in other coastal regions.

So much for the contents. In addition, I would like to draw your attention to SPC Special Interest Group newsletters and bulletins: Guidelines for authors and editors, which you can download from SPC’s website at: http://www.spc.int/coastfish/News/SIG_guidelines.pdf. It should help with your future submissions.

We are also considering instituting some form of referee system for submissions. This is being done because we are well aware that some potential authors (especially those in academic institutions) may not wish to submit to a non-refereed journal because it does nothing for their career advancement. Some of the papers we now receive reflect considerable hard work, and it is a pity that authors cannot use them for promotion. On the other hand, we realise that some authors have no need of this, and we have no wish to deter them from submitting useful and informative articles. However, now may be the time to admit that I have been informally circulating some of the contributions (with authors’ names removed) among colleagues, peers and friends to elicit opinions on suitability and quality. So, in effect, I have been operating this bulletin as a semi-refereed journal for several years now. Any opinions on what should be adopted as policy?

Kenneth Ruddle


Contents

A cultural consensus analysis of marine ecological knowledge in the Solomon Islands
Grant K.L., Miller M.L. (pdf: 204 KB)
Tabus or not taboos? How to use traditional environmental knowledge to support sustainable development of marine resources in Melanesia - Introduction
Caillaud A., Boengkih S., Evans-Illidge E., Genolagani J., Havemann P., Henao D., Kwa E., Llewell D., Ridep-Morris A., Rose J., Nari R., Skelton P., South R., Sulu R., Tawake A., Tobin B., Tuivanuavou S., Wilkinson C. (pdf: 65 KB)
Tabus or not taboos? How to use traditional environmental knowledge to support sustainable development of marine resources in Melanesia
Caillaud A., Boengkih S., Evans-Illidge E., Genolagani J., Havemann P., Henao D., Kwa E., Llewell D., Ridep-Morris A., Rose J., Nari R., Skelton P., South R., Sulu R., Tawake A., Tobin B., Tuivanuavou S., Wilkinson C. (pdf: 164 KB)
Section I: Incorporating traditional knowledge into government law. Case Study 1: Merging traditional resource management approaches and practices with the formal legal system in Vanuatu
Nari R. (pdf: 54 KB)
Section I: Incorporating traditional knowledge into government law. Case Study 2: Traditional management of marine resources in Palau
Ridep-Morris A. (pdf: 55 KB)
Section I: Incorporating traditional knowledge into government law. Case Study 3: The Loyalty Islands environment charter in Kanaky-New-Caledonia
Boengkih S. (pdf: 55 KB)
Section I: Incorporating traditional knowledge into government law. Case Study 4: Fisheries bylaws in Samoa
Skelton P., South R. (pdf: 55 KB)
Section I: Incorporating traditional knowledge into government law. Case Study 5: Traditional law and the environment in the Solomon Islands
Sulu R. (pdf: 55 KB)
Section I: Incorporating traditional knowledge into government law. Case Study 6: Customary law on Malo, South Santo, Vanuatu, and the protection of the marine environment
Llewell D. (pdf: 56 KB)
Section I: Incorporating traditional knowledge into government law. Case Study 7: Kaitiakitanga: Customary fisheries management in New Zealand
Havemann P. (pdf: 60 KB)
Section I: Incorporating traditional knowledge into government law. Case Study 8: Pohnpei watershed management: A case study of legal and institutional reform for co-management in the Pacific
Rose J. (pdf: 60 KB)
Section II: Community involvement: Community-based co-management of marine resources. Case Study 9: Community involvement in the implementation of ocean policies: The Fiji Locally Managed Marine Areas network
Tawake A., Tuivanuavou S. (pdf: 56 KB)
Section II: Community involvement: Community-based co-management of marine resources. Case Study 10: Traditional and modern law: A marriage in progress - The draft Talasea Local Government Marine Environmental Law (Papua New Guinea)
Kwa E. (pdf: 55 KB)
Section II: Community involvement: Community-based co-management of marine resources. Case Study 11: Biodiversity and sustainable use of marine biodiversity in PNG: Policy and legal implications
Genolagani J., Henao D. (pdf: 57 KB)
Section III: Traditional knowledge in an international regime. Case Study 12: Towards legal protection of traditional knowledge: Lessons from Peru
Tobin B. (pdf: 56 KB)
Section III: Traditional knowledge in an international regime. Case Study 13: The role of customary law and practice in international ABS and TK governance
Tobin B. (pdf: 66 KB)
Section III: Traditional knowledge in an international regime. Case Study 14: Oceans of opportunity: Seeking new commercial and sustainable uses of Australia's marine biodiversity
Evans-Illidge E. (pdf: 48 KB)
 

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