wif_24
Number 24 - July 2014
WIF_Title

pdf
pdf:

Coordinator: Veikila Curu Vuki, Oceania Environment Consultants, PO Box 5214, UOG Station, Mangilao, Guam 96913.

Production: Information Section, Fisheries Aquaculture and Marine Ecosystems Division, SPC, BP D5, 98848 Noumea Cedex, New Caledonia.

Prepared with financial assistance from Australia, France and New Zealand.


Editor's note

Welcome to the 24th issue of the Women in Fisheries Bulletin, which highlights gender roles in coastal fisheries, women’s fishing activities in urban and rural communities, and gender issues in development.

In the article “Gender information in Asia Pacific-FishWatch: Preparing tuna species profiles”, Meryl Williams highlights the active role of the Asian Fisheries Society in hosting gender and fisheries events and publishing symposia proceedings in the past two decades. Williams describes the Asia Pacific-FishWatch project on the skipjack tuna profile, and presents an overview of the process and challenges. In the article “From women in fisheries to gender and fisheries” Williams et al. document the chronology of events in relation to women in development, gender issues and challenges. The evolution of “women in fisheries” and the active involvement of the Asian Fisheries Society in moving more towards “gender and fisheries” are also highlighted.

In the paper “Overcoming gender inequalities in fish supply chains to inform policy and action”, Meryl Williams documents panel sessions and papers presented at the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade in Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania in 2012. The report presents insights from presenters, panelists and conference contributors during the conference.

In “Improving gender equity in aquaculture education and training: 30 years of experiences in the pond dynamics/aquaculture, aquaculture, and AquaFish Collaborative Research Support Programs (CRSP)“, Egna et al. describe AquaFish CRSP’s role in aquaculture and fisheries. The programme has successfully integrated gender by including women as beneficiaries of its research and outreach programmes. In their paper “Improvement of women’s livelihoods, income and nutrition through Carp-SIS-Prawn polyculture in Terai, Nepal”, Rai et al. write that many poor Nepalese women and children suffer malnutrition caused by a lack of vitamins and minerals in their diet. Through this programme, female farmers and their families consumed and sold the surplus of carps and prawns. The programme also provided avenues to introduce new farming methods and these resulted in the improvement of income, food and nutritional standards of women and members of their household.

Two papers were obtained from Yemaya with permission to re-publish in the Women in Fisheries Bulletin. In the paper “For a better tomorrow”, Barbara Clabots indicates through a case study in the Philippines how women benefit from participating in the management of marine protected areas. Likewise, in the paper “Shifting livelihoods”, Philile Mbatha wrote about the rapid changes in the fisheries of South Africa and Mozambique and how the communities there are adapting to coastal resource use. The article highlights the distinctive gendered nature of their livelihood, and notes how gender roles are shifting and how women are adapting to the changing environment.

Three papers from the Pacific present information about traditional fishing, the roles of men and women, and fisheries management. All of these papers are from Melanesia. In the paper on Ahamb Island in Vanuatu, Obed and Vuki discuss the different traditional fishing methods, division of labour and fisheries management of the communities. The modification of traditional fishing gear and the implications of the introduction of modern gear are also highlighted. In the paper on Gao District in the Solomon Islands, Basily and Vuki provide a description of traditional fishing methods, traditional fisheries, and the different roles of men and women. The traditional fishing methods in Gao include gleaning, river fishing, bow and arrow fishing, mangrove crab tracking, turtle fishing, reef fishing, netting and bonito fishing. Dakuidreketi and Vuki describe the freshwater fishing, fisheries management and the roles of men and women in Tonia Village, Viti Vevu, Fiji. Fishing methods in Tonia ranged from pole-and-line to net fishing.

Finally, in the paper “Women have nothing to do with fish, or do they?”, Anouk Ride notes that women are not represented in major traditional decision-making processes or village governance processes but they have an important role in leading national and local nongovernmental organisations. They are also successful in running businesses.

I welcome any feedback on these articles and encourage you to submit articles on gender and fisheries issues from your country or your region for the next issue of this bulletin.

Veikila Curu Vuki

 


Contents

Gender information in AsiaPacific-FishWatch: Preparing tuna species profiles
Williams M.J. (pdf: 401 KB)
From women in fisheries to gender and fisheries
Williams M.J., Williams S.B., Choo P.S. (pdf: 170 KB)
Overcoming gender inequalities in fish supply chains to inform policy and action
Williams M.J. (pdf: 142 KB)
Improving gender equity in aquaculture education and training: 30 years of experiences in the pond dynamics/aquaculture, aquaculture, and AquaFish collaborative research support programs
Egna H., Reifke L., Gitonga N. (pdf: 165 KB)
Improvement of women’s livelihoods, income and nutrition through Carp-SIS-Prawn polyculture in Terai, Nepal
Rai S., Thilsted S.H., Shrestha M.K., Abdul Wahab M.D., Gharti K. (pdf: 282 KB)
For a better tomorrow
Clabots B. (pdf: 98 KB)
Shifting livelihoods
Mbatha P. (pdf: 70 KB)
Traditional fishing methods and fisheries management on Ahamb Island, south Malekula, Vanuatu
Obed A., Vuki V. (pdf: 133 KB)
Traditional fishing methods and fisheries management in Gao District, Santa Isabel Island, Solomon Islands
Basily N.M., Vuki V. (pdf: 175 KB)
Freshwater fishing, fisheries management and the roles of men and women in Tonia Village, Viti Levu, Fiji
Dakuidreketi M.R., Vuki V. (pdf: 110 KB)
Empowering women in fisheries
Anon. (pdf: 112 KB)
Women have nothing to do with fish, or do they?
Ride A. (pdf: 516 KB)

Download the complete publication:

Women in fisheries #24 (pdf: )


 

 
   SPC Homepage | About SPC | Copyright © SPC 2010